Secret Millionaire

A Park, A Food Truck, and a Secret Identity

As usual with non-Hallmark TV romances this one strays from the formula just a bit. First of all we have a lack of a festival or small town/big city conflict. This one is the “save the park or whatever” plot. Hey, I didn’t say it was a complete departure!

An indulged son of a real estate mogul has been drifting from one thing to another, while his father wants him to settle down and work with him at his company. He gives him an ultimatum that he has to find a job within a week or he will be cut off from his financial support. Leaving the building he runs into some protesters who are trying to rescue their beloved park from his fathers evil development plans. He conceals his identity and gets a job as a chef in the cute one’s food truck.

Of course, it is only a matter of time before it will be discovered that he is none other than the son of the person who is trying to take the park away. Thus the suspense and tension. The predictable story is enlivened by the cast. Siobhan Williams is a fresh face and is a perfect spunky girl next door type. Steve Lund, a Hallmark regular is as attractive and reliable as usual. And yes, Steve Lund, I saw you in that Allegra commercial. A little side hustle? Good for you. The secondary couple have a sweet courtship, complicated by a rival love interest. Both of the guys are appealing until one of them turns out to be a big phony.

There is corporate-type other woman for our hero to provide some drama, and the Dad learns something about his own grandfather that leads to a happy ending for all. Of course.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

September 14, 2021

Love Upstream

“I’m Too Busy Being Fat and Mannish!”

A funny script, interspersed with good drama and suspense makes this an above average tv romance. There was great chemistry between the two leads, Kimberly-Sue Murray (perky and effervescent Charlotte) and Steve Lund (dry and cynical Rob). There were several laugh-out-loud comic scenes between the two antagonists turned lovers, as well as tension and eventual tenderness. Each of the actors made the most of the script with their excellent comic timing. And that also goes for Nadine Whiteman Roden who played Tina, the owner of the Wilderness retreat’s wife and eventual friend of Charlotte, our fish-out-of-water heroine. Her opening scene shaming an elderly “Karen” was classic. Charlotte is a devoted city girl who writes books giving relationship advice. When her fiancé dumps her, it puts her career on the verge of shambles. She changes focus and decided to write a book about how to survive in the wilderness. Just go with it.

Her showpiece scene is her panic attack while caught in an elevator with our eventual hero. He is not impressed, to say the least. His big scene is when the couple meet her snobby ex-boyfriend at a fancy restaurant who superciliously asks him what he does for a living. He replies in all seriousness that he is a Prince. So funny. And I loved how he had her back and put him in his place. The actor who played the cheating ex was a dead ringer for Tom Felton (Draco Malfoy) which made the take-down all the more satisfying. I also wanted to give props to Tenika Davis who played Charlotte’s affected snotty city friend, who inadvertently shows Charlotte that her heart is not in Chicago after all.

After her adventures, when Charlotte submits her manuscript, her editor changes it to cruelly mock her new friends. They are hurt and betrayed. Tina won’t speak to her, as she yells across the yard, “I’m too busy being “fat” and “mannish!”

Of course it all gets straightened out, and Rob’s declaration of love was sweet, romantic, and touching. Like I said, the chemistry between these two actors was the best I’ve seen in a long time. Steve Lund is now an official favorite.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

August 30, 2021

Baby, It’s Cold Inside

Bait and Switch

I signed up for a Hallmark movie and got an infomercial for the Ice Hotel in Canada. Except the script would have been better in the infomercial. The lead actress, Joceyln Hudon, droned her part out in a monotone like she couldn’t get the words out fast enough so she could be done with it. Not that I blame her. Meryl Streep couldn’t have created any interest with this lifeless script. She was pretty, blonde, and boring. Her main personality trait was being cutely clumsy. I’ve liked Steve Lund in other parts, so I’ll just move on.

This travelogue consisted of jumping from one cold weather activity to another. Baking authentic Nordic food, sliding down ice slides, hot-tubbing, touring the hotel, snow shoeing, glass-blowing, maple syrup making, and northern lights viewing. After about an hour of this frantic activity, the heroine actually asks the hotel owner what there is to do in the area. I kid you not. The most exciting thing that happened was the influential hotel reviewer got a maple syrup pop stock on his hat. There was a bit at the end where the dead-eyed jealous hotel manager (who actually was pretty scary with her coiled hostility masked by her friendly courtesy) said some mean things to our heroine and briefly scared her off the trail of a new career path and a cute boyfriend. But by that time it was too late. Thanks to that hotel hat guy (who reappeared in one of the strangest caps unless you were impersonating an Army Ranger, ever) disaster was averted.

This is the second Hallmark movie starring the Ice Hotel. I think an investigation is in order. **2 stars out of 10**

May 13, 2021